Next Class: Historical Research Methods

Up next…Historical Research Methods. Course Description: The course addresses the development of core research skills for advanced historical study. Through case studies analyses, the evaluation of different types of historical evidence, and the consideration of how valid research questions are formulated and applied, it is designed to refine the critical thinking, research, and writing skills […]

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Class starts today! Civil War Command and Leadership
John B. Hood

Class starts today! Civil War Command and Leadership The book list changed a bit since my first post.  That’s ok. The books I picked up for the old book list are good ones. Professor: Steven E. Woodworth I’ve updated the courses page with the information below. Required Texts: Glatthaar, Joseph T. Partners in Command: The […]

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Military History Word of the Day: "Refuse"
McClellan

Refuse Military. to bend or curve back (the flank units of a military force) so that they face generally to the flank rather than the front. refuse. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc.http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/refuse (accessed: August 08, 2009). It is not surprising that McClellan did not immediately decide to employ his left wing under Franklin […]

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Military History Word of the Day: "Ambuscade"

– am⋅bus⋅cade [am-buh-skeyd] noun, verb, -cad⋅ed, –noun 1. an ambush –verb (used without object) 2. to lie in ambush. –verb (used with object) 3. to attack from a concealed position; ambush. 1575–85; < MF embuscade, alter. (under influence of OF embuschier) of MF emboscade < OIt imboscata, fem. ptp. of imboscare, v. deriv. with in-  […]

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WWII Behind Closed Doors: Stalin, the Nazis and the West Premiering May 6 on PBS

In an earlier post, I mentioned that I’d been contacted by a publicist at PBS to preview the upcoming documentary that begins airing this week (May 6th), WWII Behind Closed Doors. I’ve had a chance to watch the full documentary and found it fascinating. When I think of PBS, I think of credibility. Add credibility […]

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New Kindle 2 Book Acquisitions – Military Strategists

I’ve added some titles to my Kindle 2. I own print versions of most of these but want to use the text-to-speech capabilities of the Kindle 2 to review them again while mobile. Title: The Art of War Author: Antoine de Jomini, Capt. G.H. Mendell, Lieut. W.P. Craighill Format: Kindle Edition File Size: 1387 KB […]

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Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War

Rick Atkinson. Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War. Houghton Mifflin Company, 1994. See the publisher’s book site here. Pulitzer Prize winning author Rick Atkinson presents as narrative history the Persian Gulf War from its opening salvo to the American victory parade in the nation’s capital. His stated purpose is to tell the […]

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The Army and Vietnam

Andrew F. Krepinevich, Jr. The Army and Vietnam. Reprint. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988. Change is inevitable and organizations must learn to adapt. Author Andrew Krepinevich, Jr. asserts in this work of history and analysis of the United States military experience during the Vietnam War that the army failed prepare or adapt to new […]

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On War and Words
The Name of War

As I finish up my final paper, I’ve gone back to the first book read for my class, “Studies in U.S. Military History.” Jill Lepore. The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity. Vintage Books, 1999. In this unusual book about King Phillip’s War, Lepore sets out to study war and how […]

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Southern Storm: Sherman's March to the Sea

Belatedly, I want to mention that I’ve received a pre-publication copy of Noah Andre Trudeau’s Southern Storm: Sherman’s March to the Sea, which I’ll hope to provide a full review of before too long. At first blush, it appears to be an excellent read. Since this book falls into the category of Civil War Campaigns, […]

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Technology in U.S. Military History – 2

This post continues on the theme introduced in post 1 here. The growth in technological firepower was certainly evident in the Korean War. Roy Appleton in his fascinating work, East of Chosin (see previous post here) brings to life the murderous effect of mobile artillery including the M19 full-track (dual-40) below as used by trained American soldiers in […]

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"…Technology had assumed the role of a god of war…"

“How could the army of the most powerful nation on Earth, materially supported on a scale unprecedented in history, equipped with the most sophisticated technology in an age when technology had assumed the role of a god of war, fail to emerge victorious against a numerically inferior force of lightly armed irregulars?” The above a […]

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