the places

Locations of significance during the American Civil War. – Under construction. –

Alexandria

Baltimore

Berlin

Best’s Grove

Two miles from Frederick. Location “where Jackson and D.H. Hill had already established their headquarters” and where “five leading generals of the Army of Northern Virginia pitched their tents in the same woods.” Source: Joseph L. Harsh, Take at the Flood, (Kent, Ohio: The Kent State University Press, 1999), 105-106.

Big Springs

Site of encampment of Lee’s army during his invasion of Maryland, early September, 1862.

Blacksburg

Bolivar Heights, near Harpers Ferry

Making better time than expected, A. P. Hill’s van reached the turnpike from Charlestown, turned north, and stopped just short of Halltown at eleven o’clock. Jackson could now see the enemy’s defenses on Bolivar Heights two miles to the front, but he decided not to develop his line until he had scouted the position and established contact with McLaws and Walker. Jones and Lawton were halted in the rear of Hill. 32 1

1. Joseph L. Harsh, Taken at the Flood : Robert E. Lee and Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 / [book on-line] (Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1999, accessed 9 August 2009), 228; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102364938; Internet.

Boonsboro

Buckeystown, Maryland

Bull Run, First Manassas

Catoctin Gap

Chambersburg, Pennsylvania

Charleston, South Carolina

Crampton’s Gap, South Mountain

Cumberland

Darnestown

Elk’s Ridge (Blue Ridge in Virginia?)

South of the Potomac, John Walker, who was just as isolated from the rest of the army as McLaws, broke camp at about 6:30. His two brigades marched south through Hillsboro and then turned right, heading west on the road from Leesburg. Having no notion of the situation he might encounter, Walker decided to mask his approach from the enemy in Harpers Ferry. He stopped short of Vestal Gap in the Blue Ridge and proceeded north on the road that ran between the Blue Ridge (Elk Ridge in Maryland) and the Short Hills (South Mountain in Maryland). Known locally as “between the Hills,” this dale was a continuation of Pleasant Valley across the Potomac. 1

1. Joseph L. Harsh, Taken at the Flood : Robert E. Lee and Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 / [book on-line] (Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1999, accessed 9 August 2009), 226; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102364936; Internet.

Fort Sumter

Frederick, Maryland

Gaines’ Mill

Gainesville

Hagan’s Gap, Maryland (in the Catocins)

Hagerstown, Maryland

Harper’s Ferry

Kanawha Valley

Leesburg

Loudoun County

Loudoun Heights

Passing through Neersville, Walker reached the eastern foot of Loudoun Heights, the crown of the Blue Ridge on the Potomac, by ten o’clock. Here he was greeted by the ominous sound of a cannonade in the water gap beyond the mountain. The mysterious firing was soon explained, as up rode a party of engineers and signal officers sent by Jackson to guide the placement of artillery and open communications between the columns. Walker thus learned that the nature of his mission had changed. He had now become one element in a complicated siege operation. 1

1. Joseph L. Harsh, Taken at the Flood : Robert E. Lee and Confederate Strategy in the Maryland Campaign of 1862 / [book on-line] (Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1999, accessed 9 August 2009), 226; available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102364936; Internet.

Manassas

Maryland Heights

  • Overlook Harpers Ferry on the Maryland side
  • 2000 ft. mountain
  • Captured by McLaws forces on September 13, 1862
  • A signal party place there
  • Federal artillery was carried off or spiked leaving Confederates n need of hauling up guns

Martinsburg

Mason-Dixon Line

Middleburg

Middletown Valley

Monocacy Junction

Where the Frederick spur line joined he main B’&’O line just west of the river.

Narrows

Offutt’s Crossroads

Pleasant Valley, Maryland

Point of Rocks

Port Royal, South Carolina

Ravenswood

Richmond, Virginia

Rockville

Sandy Hook, village near Harpers Ferry at the base of the mountain

Secessionville, South Carolina

Sharpsburg

Shenandoah Valley

South Mountain

Tennallytown

Thoroughfare Gap

Three Springs

Near Buckeystown, site of encampments of Lee’s army as it invaded Maryland in September, 1862.

Turner’s Gap, South Mountain

Vestal Gap, Blue Ridge Mountains

Washington

Williamsport, Maryland

Winchester, Virginia

One Reply to “the places”

  1. Great site! My civil war knowledge consists of having read the Shaara trilogy and touring the battlefields at Gettysburg. I’ll look forward to visiting occasionally to learn what you’re learning!

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