And so we watch history being made…

It’s poignant that I’ve started a course this week that examines antebellum America – a country of profound inequality and bigotry. If you are an American, regardless of who you voted for, I hope you celebrate the process of democracy that we shared in together today. And marvel at the incredible journey that this country […]

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For the Common Defense

Peter Maslowski and Allan R. Millett. For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America. Enlarged edition. Simon & Schuster, 1994. See the book on publisher’s site here. This monumental survey of American military history has three stated purposes. The first is to analyze the development of military policy. The second […]

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Civil War Blog Addition and British History Online

I’ve made some additional adds to my blogroll and links. First a belated welcome to Jim Beeghley whose blog, “Teaching the Civil War with Technology” has not only a strong premise but some terrific posts. Welcome Jim! http://blog.teachthecivilwar.com And thanks to Alex Rose over at The History Man blog for a lead to British History […]

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Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America

Jennifer D. Keene. Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003. See the JHUP book reference here. Jennifer Keene, (see her bio here) in her study of the experience of American soldiers who served in World War I, sets as goal to fill what she contends is a […]

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On War and Words
The Name of War

As I finish up my final paper, I’ve gone back to the first book read for my class, “Studies in U.S. Military History.” Jill Lepore. The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity. Vintage Books, 1999. In this unusual book about King Phillip’s War, Lepore sets out to study war and how […]

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Southern Storm: Sherman's March to the Sea

Belatedly, I want to mention that I’ve received a pre-publication copy of Noah Andre Trudeau’s Southern Storm: Sherman’s March to the Sea, which I’ll hope to provide a full review of before too long. At first blush, it appears to be an excellent read. Since this book falls into the category of Civil War Campaigns, […]

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Military History word of the day: "thalassocracy"

I ran across this word in my reading today and have added it to “the terms” page (here) where I collect definitions of words I didn’t know. I’m continuing to finish the last book in my current course on Studies in U.S. Military History, Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War, by Rick Atkinson. […]

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Baltimore Sun's Civil War Books Discussion

Dave Rosenthal, the Sunday and Readership Editor for the Baltimore Sun, asked me to contribute to a discussion of Civil War Books on their book blog, Read Street. I’m up for any opportunity to talk about books. Check out my recommendations and those of fellow commentators here.

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Blogkeeping…hello, goodbye

I am making a couple of blogroll updates, both fellow WordPress bloggers… First, John Maass is closing shop which is sad but understandable. John – hope you’ll continue to stay in touch. I really enjoyed your blog. And best of luck in future endeavors. I plan to keep his link on my blogroll because there […]

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On History Grad Student Fitness…

     News flash… Graduate students in history sit on their backsides and read…a lot. I’ve noticed the impact on my fitness level. I have found a solution… I plan to walk while I work, read, and write. I just bought one of these bad-boys… and it was worth every penny. Quiet, easy, and tilts up […]

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Manet and the ACW – 3: Captain Semmes and the CSS Alabama

Continuing from posts 1 here and 2 here, in this post I begin to examine what authors Juliet Wilson-Bareau and David C. Degener in their book Manet and the American Civil War call “one of the most celebrated naval battles of the American Civil War.” The authors adeptly set the scene by providing the reasons […]

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Manet and the American Civil War – 2 The Artist

Continuing from post 1 here, in this post I explore the life of Edouard Manet, the artist. Born in 1832 to upper-middle class parents, Manet’s father was a magistrate who had hopes that his oldest son would follow him in his profession. But young Edouard had no interest in law and though attracted to art, […]

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Technology in U.S. Military History – 1

My current course on Studies in U. S. Military History (see courses page here) is drawing to a close. We have been examining the last of Millett and Maslowski’s major themes which is that “the United States has used increasingly sophisticated technology to overcome logistical limitations and to match enemy numbers with firepower.” [i] I find this supportable in […]

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