Manet and the American Civil War – 1

A recently received a gift of a book that I am thrilled to add to my library. It is, Manet and the American Civil War published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York [which I had the opportunity to visit for the first time this year], and Yale University Press. It is co-authored by Juliet Wilson-Bareau, “an […]

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Technology in U.S. Military History – 4

This post completes this series on Technology in U.S. Military History. See post 1 here, 2 here, and 3 here. P. Balaram in his editorial for Current Science titled “Science, Technology and War,” describes the widespread use of incendiaries and chemical defoliants which, he suggests, “reached its peak during the Vietnam War, with the United […]

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Technology in U. S. Military History – 3

This post continues on the theme introduced in post 1 here and continued in post 2 here. The growth in level of focus that the United States has placed on technology as manifested by the Vietnam War era cannot be stated better than by Andrew F. Krepinevich (The Army and Vietnam) who posited that the United […]

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Technology in U.S. Military History – 2

This post continues on the theme introduced in post 1 here. The growth in technological firepower was certainly evident in the Korean War. Roy Appleton in his fascinating work, East of Chosin (see previous post here) brings to life the murderous effect of mobile artillery including the M19 full-track (dual-40) below as used by trained American soldiers in […]

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Technology in U.S. Military History – 1

My current course on Studies in U. S. Military History (see courses page here) is drawing to a close. We have been examining the last of Millett and Maslowski’s major themes which is that “the United States has used increasingly sophisticated technology to overcome logistical limitations and to match enemy numbers with firepower.” [i] I find this supportable in […]

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Coggins' Arms and Equipment of the Civil War

I’m a fan of Jack Coggins. An author and illustrator, Coggins has captured some golden nuggets of information in his book,  Arms and Equipment of the Civil War. He has also written and illustrated a number of other mlitary history books no doubt influenced by his tour of duty as illustrator for YANK magazine during World War […]

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"…Technology had assumed the role of a god of war…"

“How could the army of the most powerful nation on Earth, materially supported on a scale unprecedented in history, equipped with the most sophisticated technology in an age when technology had assumed the role of a god of war, fail to emerge victorious against a numerically inferior force of lightly armed irregulars?” The above a […]

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Military History Word of the Day: Enfilade

From a letter by Private Mathew A. Dunn of Company C, 33rd Mississippi Infantry Regiment, to his wife shortly after the Battle of Peachtree Creek. “Our Reg. suffered worse than any other, being on the flank and was exposed to an enfilading fire. We lost our Col. He charged waving his Sword until he fell.” […]

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The Online Library of Liberty

Always in search of primary sources relevant to military history, I wanted to pass along the following find. The Online Library of Liberty is a free access website maintained by the Liberty Fund, Inc. The Liberty Fund Library provides online resources in multiple categories including philosophy, art, economics, war and peace and much, much more. […]

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Two Brothers: One North, One South

While on vacation, I received a review copy of David H. Jones’ Two Brothers: One North, One South. This has moved very quickly up to the top of my reading stack for between terms. It is an aesthetically beautiful book. And I’m impressed by the weaving of fact into the story. I’m also hooked by […]

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Professional Military Reading List Links Added

Please note that I’m in process of adding more links to the right nav bar under the heading of “Reading Lists.” Collected here are professional military reading lists and those associated with universities in military history. These lists are really quite interesting and range from the classical works of military theorists to the latest in business leadership. […]

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Scientific Optimism: Jomini and the U.S. Army

Those of you who follow my postings know that I’ve ruminated a bit on Jomini (pictured above). You can find the complete list of related posts here. For those who find discussion of Jomini and Clausewitz interesting, I wanted to pass along a link to an excellent essay by Major Gregory Ebner titled “Scientific Optimism: Jomini and the U.S. […]

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Civil War Railroad Page Updated

By way of housekeeping, I’ve updated the Popular Series Posts page on the right nav bar titled Civil War Railroads here with the latest series of posts titled “Stewards of Civil War Railroads.” Above: United States Military Railroad 4-4-0 locomotive W.H. Whiton (built by William Mason in 1862) in January 1865 with Abraham Lincoln’s presidential […]

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May Civil War and Military History Book Acquisitions – II

Continuing with my May book acquisitions which illustrate, as said by Civil War Interactive’s comments on my blog this week, why bank robbery may be needed to support my book-buying habits… Mr. Lincoln’s T-Mails: How Abraham Lincoln Used the Telegraph to Win the Civil War By Tom Wheeler ISBN-10: 0061129801 Paperback: 256 pages Publisher: Collins; […]

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