Photo of Lt. General Grant's Fascinating Staff at Center Point, Virginia

I ran across this excellent photo of Grant’s staff pictured below in City Point, Virginia on the Army Heritage Collection Online site. According to the writing on the matting, included are: 1st Lieut. William McKee Dunn, Jr. (seated left), Lt. Col. E. S. Parker (larger man seated to left of door), and Lt. Col. Theodore […]

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The American Civil War and the Origins of Modern Warfare

Edward Hagerman. The American Civil War and the Origins of Modern Warfare: Ideas, Organization, and Field Command. Reprint. Indiana University Press, 1992. In this important work on tactical and strategic military history, Edward Hagerman posits that the American Civil War marshaled in a new era in land warfare colored by the impacts of the Industrial […]

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Southern Storm: Sherman's March to the Sea

Belatedly, I want to mention that I’ve received a pre-publication copy of Noah Andre Trudeau’s Southern Storm: Sherman’s March to the Sea, which I’ll hope to provide a full review of before too long. At first blush, it appears to be an excellent read. Since this book falls into the category of Civil War Campaigns, […]

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May Civil War and Military History Book Acquisitions – I

Catching up on acquisitions of new books in May. I’ve really got to get on a book budget. Note that I’ve added two new category pages to my vitural bookshelves here. These include: Civil War Communications and Civil War Fortifications Military History I’ve added serveral recommended military history reference books.  Encyclopedia of American Military History […]

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Lee's Failure to Entrench

“Lee took longer to learn from his experience that the frontal assault contributed only to attrition without victory than any other field commander in the Civil War.”[i] Edward Hagerman covers in detail the practices of the Federal and Confederate armies as it relates to entrenchment. McClellan and his successors employed it masterfully. Lee and his […]

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Civil War History Phrase of the Day – The Flying Column

Supply and logistics were a huge challenge for the Army of the Potomac and this was certainly true as General Joseph Hooker (above, 1814 – 1879) contemplated moving his massive 163,000 man army offensively against Lee near the Rappahannock in the Spring of 1863. Breaking the logistical chain was the challenge. According to author Edward Hagerman, Quartermaster […]

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