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The American Civil War and the Origins of Modern Warfare

The American Civil War and the Origins of Modern Warfare

Edward Hagerman. The American Civil War and the Origins of Modern Warfare: Ideas, Organization, and Field Command. Reprint. Indiana University Press, 1992. In this important work on tactical and strategic military history, Edward Hagerman posits that the American...
Stewards of Civil War Railroads – Part II Davis

Stewards of Civil War Railroads – Part II Davis

This post continues from Part I, here. Jefferson Davis (above) and the Confederate Congress, by contrast, were reluctant to wrestle control of the railroads away from civilian owners. This was consistent with a laissez faire pattern exhibited by Davis on a number of...
Stewards of Civil War Railroads – Part I Lincoln

Stewards of Civil War Railroads – Part I Lincoln

The decisions made by leaders of the North and South regarding the dispensations of their respective railroads, could arguably be some of the most impactful of the war. Armies on both sides considered railroads critical. But Lincoln and Davis approached the control...
Lee's Failure to Entrench

Lee's Failure to Entrench

“Lee took longer to learn from his experience that the frontal assault contributed only to attrition without victory than any other field commander in the Civil War.”[i] Edward Hagerman covers in detail the practices of the Federal and Confederate armies...
Civil War History Phrase of the Day – The Flying Column

Civil War History Phrase of the Day – The Flying Column

Supply and logistics were a huge challenge for the Army of the Potomac and this was certainly true as General Joseph Hooker (above, 1814 Р1879) contemplated moving his massive 163,000 man army offensively against Lee near the Rappahannock in the Spring of 1863....