Military History Carnival – May 2010

Welcome to the May 2010 edition of the Military History Carnival featuring some of the best recent military history from around the web. This is the first time that Wig-Wags has hosted and it’s been a pleasure to do. I’ve picked up some great information and hope you will as well. Today’s edition covers a […]

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Civil War U.S. Navy Admiral David Farragut – 2 First Voyage

David Glasgow Farragut, the man who would become the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy and a Civil War naval hero, was born on the fifth of July 1801 “in a log cabin on a 640-acre tract of land on the north bank of the Holston River about fifteen miles southwest of Knoxville,” Tennessee.” (1) […]

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Taming Democracy: "The People," the Founders, and the Troubled Ending of the American Revolution

I was delighted to find a package from Oxford University Press waiting at my door this afternoon and in it was a review copy of the new paperback edition of Terry Bouton’s Taming Democracy: “The People,” the Founders, and the Troubled Ending of the American Revolution. This looks to be a fascinating read, one that […]

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E. L. Doctorow's The March and The Whiskey Rebels: A Novel by David Liss

Two new fiction works have made their way to my library. The March by E. L. Doctorow. This book was required reading for the Yale course by David W. Blight on the Civil War era which I mentioned here. I picked up a nice hardback used and am listening to it on my MP3 via […]

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For the Common Defense

Peter Maslowski and Allan R. Millett. For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America. Enlarged edition. Simon & Schuster, 1994. See the book on publisher’s site here. This monumental survey of American military history has three stated purposes. The first is to analyze the development of military policy. The second […]

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A Revolutionary People at War: The Continental Army and American Character, 1775-1783

Charles Royster. A Revolutionary People at War: The Continental Army and American Character, 1775-1783. Reprint. University of North Carolina Press, 1996. In his award winning, sweeping work on the American Revolution, Charles Royster sets out to prove his thesis that “there was an American character prevalent during the War for Independence and that we can […]

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Stewards of Civil War Railroads – Part II Davis

This post continues from Part I, here. Jefferson Davis (above) and the Confederate Congress, by contrast, were reluctant to wrestle control of the railroads away from civilian owners. This was consistent with a laissez faire pattern exhibited by Davis on a number of issues involving civilian commercial interests and may have been a response to […]

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Fabian Strategy and the American Civil War

One of the concepts Millett and Maslowski mention in their book, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States of America, is the Fabian Strategy. It refers to an approach by one side in a military conflict who avoids big decisive battles in favor of small engagements designed to wear the opposition down, […]

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Military History Phrase of the Day: A Pyrrhic Victory

I ran across the phrase “A Pyrrhic Victory” this evening in reference to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse (teachers, see great lesson plan on this battle here) where Nathaniel Greene and Lt. General Charles, Earl Cornwallis clashed in one of the most important battles of the American Revolution. Charles, Earl Cornwallis (pictured below, see bio here) Nathaniel Greene […]

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Sobering Numbers

As I was finishing up my reading on the American Revolution this evening, I learned the following regarding the percentage of the American population killed in several of our wars. 1st place:  Civil War  – 1.6 %  of population killed 2nd place: American Revolution – 1.0 % of population killed By contrast, 0.06 % of […]

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Fixing an Army – Steuben

I’m still finishing up last week’s reading of A Revolutionary People at War: The Continential Army and American Character, 1775 – 1783 by Charles Royster which has been very interesting albeit a bit redundant at times. It covers in some detail the character of both American (and to some extent British) enlisted men and officers. Also examined are […]

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Next Course – Books!

Next class starts Monday – Studies in U.S. Military History. I posted earlier a description of the class here. I stacked up all the the required reading texts today in “historical order.” IMPRESSIVE! All are listed on my bookshelves here.  

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Program of Study – M.A. Military History – American Civil War

For those interested, I have posted the full program of study for my Masters program on “the courses” page here. It’s pretty solid at this point with the exception of an elective. I’ve now purchased all required books for my upcoming course, “Studies in U.S. Military History” which starts April 7th. It’s a BIG stack. As […]

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Next Course: "Studies in U.S. Military History"

I just took a break from working on my academic book review due today to register for my next class which starts April 7. “Studies in Military History” is the second in the “core” requirements courses and so deals with more general topics. The first was “Great Military Philosophers.” The course examines the military heritage […]

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