New Webcast Series on Civil War – AMU and Weider History Group

AMU Civil War Webcasts

AMU Civil War Webcasts

The American Military University (AMU) and the Weider History Group will be presenting a series of live webcasts on the Civil War that look promising. I’m excited to see this line up and think it a terrific educational venue made accessible to anyone. Here’s a quick run down. Oh and HEADS UP! The first webinar is tomorrow so be sure to register! The last one was terrific.

Civil War Soldier

The Common Soldier of the Civil War – Live Webcast
Tuesday, April 20, 2010 – 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. ET

There is a renewed and growing interest in the common soldier of the Civil War. From battling in muddy trenches to charging through fields of enemy fire, the common soldier also combated the equally-deadly diseases that plagued the theater of war. But what motivated him to fight? This live webcast will bring light to what it must have been like for these men to “see the elephant” and how they spent their time both on active campaigning and winter camp.

The Battle of Shiloh – Live Webcast
Thursday, May 6, 2010 – 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. ET

Could a decisive victory at Shiloh have changed the outcome of the war? This webcast will highlight the importance of the Battle of Shiloh and the effect it had on the outcome of the Civil War. Our speakers will also discuss what would have happened in case of a decisive Confederate victory at Shiloh.

The Battle of Gettysburg – Live Webcast
Tuesday, May 18, 2010 – 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. ET

How important is the Battle of Gettysburg to the study, discussion and portrayal of the Civil War today? How do historians interpret a single battle that changed the way Lincoln viewed the Civil War? This live webcast event will bring to light aspects of the Battle of Gettysburg ranging from the importance of the battle, to our memory of the Civil War, to how the battle is still being fought as Americans debate various interpretations of the battlefield.

The Best Civil War Photos on LIFE.com

Mary Walker
"Mary Walker (1832 – 1919) was the Army's first female surgeon during the Civil War, but led an altogether storied life as an early American abolitionist, feminist, and doctor. In 1864, she was captured by Confederate troops and charged as a spy, but was eventually released in a prisoner exchange. After the ordeal, the government awarded Walker the Medal of Honor for her bravery, the only woman to ever given such an honor. Here, Walker pictured circa 1865." Source: Life.com

The good folks at LIFE.com have published some of the most compelling photographs of the American Civil War in recognition of the Confederate surrender on April 9, 1865.  At their invitation, I’ve grabbed a few including the photo above of Mary Walker, timely given the soon to be released Civil War era historical novel My Name is Mary Sutter by Robin Oliveira. (See “New Arrivals from Publishers” on the center nav bar of Wig-Wags.com).

The picture below of a young sailor I ran across in my reading on the Battle of Mobile Bay.

Civil War Navy Powder Monkey
A young "powder monkey" -- one who filled canon cartridges below a ship's deck -- on the USS New Hampshire in Charleston, South Carolina, circa 1864. Source: LIFE.com

You can link to the full gallery on LIFE.com here.

Next Class: Historical Research Methods

Up next…Historical Research Methods.

Course Description:

The course addresses the development of core research skills for advanced historical study. Through case studies analyses, the evaluation of different types of historical evidence, and the consideration of how valid research questions are formulated and applied, it is designed to refine the critical thinking, research, and writing skills that are fundamental to valid historical scholarship.

Texts:

From Reliable Sources: An Introduction to Historical Methods

Information Literate Historian : Guide to Research for History Students

Kings of War – New addition to Wig-Wags Blogroll

Kings of War Blog

Kings of War Blog

Kings of War is a new addition to my blogroll and a great one. Bloggers include “faculty and research students of the Department of War Studies, King’s College London.”Included among the writers are: David Betz, The Faceless Bureaucrat, Kenneth Payne, Thomas Rid, Rob Dover, David Ucko, Tim Stevens, Captain Hyphen, and Paula Broadwell.

I like the organization. This from “The Idea” page.

Kings of War is about strategy, widely defined.

We assign each of our posts to one (or more) of seven “columns” – the tabs at the top of the page. Alanbrooke is about British national security and defense. Clausewitz deals with strategic theory. Galula explores counterinsurgency. Grant, like the U.S. general and president, is concerned with American grand strategy. Mao covers insurgency and terrorism. Thucydides is history. Turing, as in Alan Turing, reviews cyberwar and the virtual dimension of conflict.

Good reading!

Civil War U.S. Navy Admiral David Farragut 3 – First Command

Battle of the <em>Essex</em> and the HMS <em>Phoebe</em>
Duel of the USS Essex and HMS Pheobe

Civil War hero and admiral David Farragut literally grew up at sea. In the U.S. Navy since the age of ten, he served under David Porter as a midshipman beginning in 1811 on the USS Essex. A surrogate father, “Porter supervised his education and training while seizing every opportunity to throw responsibility on the boy.”[1] His first command, at the age of twelve, was of a prize ship, the recaptured American whaler Barclay. [2] Success in this command required that the young Farragut deal with the Barclay’s disgruntled captain, and he accomplished this by threatening to throw the man overboard if he came up on deck. The tactic worked and earned him early respect. [3]

David Farragut saw action against the H.M.S. Phoebe while serving on the USS Essex in 1813. [4] During the USS Essex’s losing battle with the HMS Phoebe, “Farragut served as captain’s aide, quarter gunner, and powder boy. He witnessed the evisceration of a boatswain’s mate by one shot, the amputation of a quartermaster’s leg by another, and the killing of four men by a third shot that splattered him with the last man’s brains. He narrowly escaped death himself when a shot struck a man beside him full in the face. The man fell back on him, and the two tumbled down an open hatch, with the man landing on top of him” sans head. [5] So Farragut was intimately familiar with both the fog of war and its horrors.

See an excellent summary of the sea battle between USS Essex and the HMS Phoebe here.

[1] The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea, Peter Kemp, ed., (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988), 296.
[2] Schneller, Jr., Robert J. Farragut: America’s First Admiral. (Washington, D.C.: Brassey’s, Inc., 2002), 12.
[3] Ibid.
[4] The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea, Peter Kemp, ed., (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988), 296.
[5] Schneller, Jr., Robert J. Farragut: America’s First Admiral, 13-14.