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Thoreau, Whitman and Emerson Added to My Library

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One of the things I’ve been a bit surprised by along the way of my military history studies is my growing interest in all aspects of the times I’m studying. During my first course on the American Civil War, it became obvious that the artists of the time played an important role. I was very pleased that PBS aired a profile of Walt Whitman tonight on The American Experience. Good stuff.

To that end, I’ve added the following three books to my library this week. You’ll find them on my virtual bookshelves here.

Poetry and Prose (Library of America College Editions)

Whitman: Poetry and Prose (Library of America College Editions)
By Walt Whitman

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers / Walden; Or, Life in the Woods / The Maine Woods / Cape Cod (Library of America)

Henry David Thoreau : A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers / Walden; Or, Life in the Woods / The Maine Woods / Cape Cod (Library of America)

First and Second Series / Representative Men / English Traits / The Conduct of Life (Library of America)

Essays and Lectures: Nature: Addresses and Lectures / Essays: First and Second Series / Representative Men / English Traits / The Conduct of Life (Library of America)
By Ralph Waldo Emerson

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2 thoughts on “Thoreau, Whitman and Emerson Added to My Library

  1. Hey Chris,
    Thanks for the tip. I actually own The Dante Club but hadn’t gotten around to reading it yet. I’m now VERY intrigued. I really enjoy good historical fiction and especially enjoy it when the element of mystery is weaved in. So this sounds like a book I need to read!

    I’ve been thinking of you as I read A People’s Army knowing your interest in early American History. I think you’d find it quite interesting particularly because of the focus on the experiences of men who went to war with the British against the French (aka Seven Year War). The cultural differences between the “regular” and the “provincial” armies is startling.

    Chris – thanks again for stopping by Wig Wags!

    Rene

  2. Rene,
    Not sure if you’re interested in fictional accounts of this era/topic, but if so, I recently read a good book called The Dante Club (by Matthew Pearl). Taking place in 1865 Boston, the story finds Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell, and J.T. Fields in the midst of a their landmark translation of Dante’s Inferno. All the while, a series of murders has Boston in a panic, murders that bear an eerie resemblance to the translation itself.

    Anyway, it was a great read. Especially as a glimpse into the lives and culture (albeit fictionalized) of these great writers.

    Worth checking out.

    Chris C.